Muslim Association of Guam

Creating understanding and harmony

The Muslim Association of Guam was founded in 1990 to meet the needs of the growing Muslim community on Guam, although membership has varied over the years from a high of more than 100 to the current total of about fifty. The association also serves as a unified body to provide Islamic information to the general public and has a stated goal of creating understanding and harmony between the different religions on Guam.

Muslims in the association worship at Masjid Al-noor, the only Muslim place of worship on Guam. The center is located near Ladera Towers in the central village of Mangilao. It was built over the period of three years, due to budgetary constraints, and was opened in 2000. The center offers five daily prayer services, Friday congregation prayers and sermon, Friday night classes for children, and family gatherings on alternate Sundays. The sermons are done in English with quoted verses from the holy Qur`an in Arabic.

During special times such as Ramadan, community fast breaking and nightly prayers are offered. Members often use the center to celebrate the two Muslim feasts (feast of Ramadan and feast of Al-adha). The association provides religious guidance to Muslims on Guam and ceremonies in case of funerals, marriages, divorce and other occasions.

The traditional leader of the Muslim community is the Imam, who is not elected but is the most knowledgeable person in the community who leads the prayers. The current Imam is Muhammad Asmuni (Muni) Abdullah, an architect with a private practice. In his absence, the next most knowledgeable member of the community takes over his duties. Abdullah’s predecessor was Farouq Abawi a longtime professor at the University of Guam.

Although the membership of the Muslim Association is not large, it varies largely in ethnicity and country of origin. Almost all members are U.S. citizens, but originate from such countries as Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sudan, Eritrea, Morocco, Egypt, Indonesia, Malaysia, Guam and the United States. Members consider themselves mainstream Muslims and follow the universal message of Islam.

Beliefs

Followers of Islam, known as Muslims, believe that God (or Allah in Arabic) revealed his direct word for mankind to Muhammad (c. 570–632) and other prophets, including Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus. Muslims believe that Muhammad is the last of the Prophets, and assert that the main written record of revelation to humankind is the Qur`an.

Muslims believe that parts of the Gospels, Torah and Jewish prophetic books (though originally divine in their nature) have been forgotten, misinterpreted, incorrectly edited by humans, or distorted by their followers and thus their original message has been corrupted over time, and they view the Qur`an as a correction of Jewish and Christian scriptures, and a final revelation.

The basis of Islamic belief is found in the shahadatan (“two testimonies”):

There is no god but God; Muhammad is the messenger of God.

In order to become a Muslim, one needs to recite and believe in these statements.

The other pillars of Islam include:

  • Prayer (called salat): Obligatory prayers are performed five times a day by every Muslim. There is no hierarchical authority in Islam, and no priests, so the prayers are led by a learned person who knows the Qur`an, chosen by the congregation. These five prayers contain verses from the Qur`an, and are said in Arabic, the language of the Revelation. Prayers are said at dawn, noon, mid-afternoon, sunset and nightfall, and thus determine the rhythm of the entire day. Although it is preferable to worship together in a mosque, a Muslim may pray almost anywhere.
  • Charity (called zakat): A percentage of each Muslim’s income is given to his fellow man. The percentage is determined by each individual person, although it is customarily two and a half percent.
  • The Fast: Every year in the month of Ramadan (using the twelve-month Islamic lunar calendar), all Muslims fast from first light until sundown, abstaining from food, drink, and sexual relations. Those who are sick, elderly, or on a journey, and women who are pregnant or nursing are permitted to break the fast and make up an equal number of days later in the year. If they are physically unable to do this, they must feed a needy person for every day missed. Children begin to fast (and to observe the prayer) from puberty, although many start earlier.
  • Pilgrimmage (Hajj): The annual pilgrimage to Makkah is a once in a lifetime obligation only for those who are physically and financially able to perform it. About two million people travel to Makkah each year. The annual Hajj begins in the twelfth month of the Islamic year. Pilgrims wear special clothes: simple garments which strip away distinctions of class, wealth and culture, so that all stand equal before God.

By Leo Babauta

 

This piece is taken from the website of Guampedia.

See on-line at: http://guampedia.com/muslim-association-of-guam/

Posted in Guam, Muslim Association of Guam | Tagged | Leave a comment

Muslim Women’s National Network Australia (MWNNA) – Our Constitution

PART I – PRELIMINARY

1. DEFINITIONS

(1) In these rules 4, ordinary member” means a member of the committee who is not an office-bearer of the association, as referred. to in rule 14(2); “secretary” means

(a) the person holding office under these rules as secretary of the association; or
(b) if no such person holds that office – the public officer of the association; “special general meeting” means a general meeting of the association other than an annual general meeting”the Act” means the Associations Incorporation Act 1984; “the Regulation” means the Associations Incorporation Regulation 1994.

(2) In these rules :

(a) a reference to a function includes a reference to a power, authority and duty; and
(b) a reference to the exercise of a function includes, if the function is a duty, a reference to the performance of the duty.

(3) The provisions of the Interpretation Act 1987 apply to and in respect of these rules in the same manner as those provisions would so apply if these rules were an instrument made under the Act.

PART II – MEMBERSHIP

2. MEMBERSHIP QUALIFICATIONS

A person is qualified to be a member of the association if, but only if

(a) the person is a person referred to in section 15 (1) (a), (b) or (c) of the Act and has not ceased to be a member of the association at any time after incorporation of the association under the Act. or

(b) the person is a natural person :

(i) who has been nominated for membership of the association as provided by rule 3; and
(ii) who has been approved for membership of the association by the committee of the association,

3. NOMINATION FOR MEMBERSHIP

(1) A nomination of a person for membership of the association (a) must be made by a member of the association in writing in the form set out in Appendix I to these rules.. and (b) must be lodged with the secretary of the association.

(2) As soon as practicable after receiving a nomination for membership, the secretary must refer the nomination to the committee which is to determine whether to approve or to reject the nomination.

(3) If the committee determines to approve a nomination for membership, the secretary must,

– as soon as practicable after that determination, notify the nominee .of that approval and request the nominee to pay (within the period of 28 days after receipt by the nominee of the notification) the sum payable under these rules by a member as entrance fee and annual subscription,

(4) The secretary must, on payment by the nominee of the amounts referred to in clause (3) within the period referred to in that clause, enter the nominee’s name in the register of members and, on the name being so entered, the nominee becomes a member of the association.

4. CESSATION OF MEMBERSHIP

A person ceases to be a member of the association if the person:

(a) dies; or
(b) resigns membership; or
(c) is expelled from the association.

5. MEMBERSHIP ENTITLEMENTS NOT TRANSFERABLE

A right, privilege or obligation which a person has by reason of being a member of the association:

(a) is not capable of being transferred or transmitted to another person; and
(b) terminates on cessation of the person’s membership.

6. RESIGNATION OF MEMBERSHIP

(1) A member of the association is not entitled to resign that membership except in accordance with this rule.

(2) A member of the association who has paid all amounts payable by the member to the association in respect of the member’s membership may resign from membership of the association by first giving to the secretary written notice of at least one month (or such other period as the committee may determine) of the member’s intention to resign and, on the expiration of the period of notice, the member ceases to be a member.

(3) If a member of the association ceases to be a member under clause (2), and in every other case where a member ceases to hold membership, the secretary must make an appropriate entry in the register of members recording the date on which the member ceased to be a member.

7. REGISTER OF MEMBERS

(1) The public officer of the association must establish and maintain a register of members of the association specify the name and address of each§ person who is a member of the association together with the date on which the person became a member.

(2), The register of members must be kept at the principal place of administration of the association and must be open for inspection, free of charge, by any member of the association at any reasonable hour.

FEES AND

8. SUBSCRIPTIONS

(1) A member of the association must, on admission to membership, pay to the association a fee of $1 or, if some other amount is determined by the committee, that other amount.

(2) In addition to any amount payable by the member under clause (1), a member the association must pay to the association an annual membership fee of $2 or, if some other amount is determined by the committee, that other amount

(a) except as provided by paragraph (b), before I July in each calendar year, or
(b) if the member becomes a member on or after I July in any calendar year – on becoming a member and before I July in each succeeding calendar year.

9. MEMBERS’ LIABILITIES

The liability of a member of the association to contribute towards the payment of the debts and liabilities of the association or the costs, charges and expenses of the winding up of the association is limited to the amount, if any, unpaid by the member in respect of membership of the association as required by rule 8.

10. RESOLUTION OF INTERNAL DISPUTES

Disputes between members (in their capacity as members) of the association, and disputes between members and the association, are to be referred to a community justice centre for mediation in accordance with the Community Justice. Centres Act 1983.

11. DISCIPLINING OF MEMBERS

(1) A complaint may be made by any member of the association that some other member of the association :

(a) has persistently refused or neglected to comply with a provision or provisions of these rules, or
(b) has persistently and wilfully acted in a manner prejudicial to the interests of the association.

(2) On receiving such a complaint, the committe :

(a) must cause notice of the complaint to be served on the member concerned; and
(b) must give the member at least 14 days from the time the notice is served within which to make submissions to the committee in connection with the complaint; and
(c) must take into consideration any submissions made by the member in connection with the complaint.

(3) The committee may, by resolution, expel the member from the association or suspend the member from membership of the association if, after considering the complaint and any submissions made ‘in connection with the complaint, it is satisfied that the facts alleged in the complaint have been proved.

(4) If the committee expels or suspends a member, the secretary must, within 7 days after the action is taken, cause written notice to be given to the member of the action taken,’of the reasons given by the committee for having taken that action and of the member’s right of appeal -under rule 12.

(5) The expulsion or suspension does not take effect :

(a) until the expiration of the period within which the member is entitled to appeal against the resolution concerned; or
(b) if within that period the member exercises the right of appeal, unless and until the association confirms the resolution under rule 12 (4), whichever is the later.

12. RIGHT OF APPEAL OF DISCIPLINED MEMBER

(1) A member may appeal to the association in general meeting against a resolution of the committee under rule 11, within 7 days after notice of the resolution is served on the member, by lodging with the secretary a notice to that effect.

(2) The notice may, but need not, be accompanied by a statement of the grounds on which the member intends to rely for the purposes of the appeal.

(3) On receipt of a notice from a member under clause (1), the secretary must notify the committee which is to convene a general meeting of the association to be held within 28 days after the date on which the secretary received the notice.

(4) At a general meeting of the association convened under clause (3) :

(a) no business other than the question of the appeal is to be transacted, and
(b) the committee and the member must be given the opportunity to state their respective cases orally or in writing, or both: nd
(c) the members present are to vote by secret ballot on the question of whether the resolution should be confirmed or revoked.

(5) If at the general meeting the association passes a special resolution in favour of the confirmation of the resolution, the resolution is confirmed.
PART III – THE COMMITTEE

13. POWERS OF THE COMMITTEE

The committee is to be called the committee of management of the association and, subject to the Act, the Regulation and these rules and to any resolution passed by the association in general meeting

(a) is to control and manage the affairs of the association: and
(b) may exercise all such functions as may be exercised by the association, other than those functions that are required by these rules to be exercised by a general meeting of members of the association, and
(c) has power to perform all such acts and do all such things as appear to the committee to be necessary or desirable for the proper management of the affairs of the association,

14. CONSTITUTION:AND MEMBERSHIP

(1) Subject in the case of the first members of the committee to section 21 of the Act, the committee is to consist of

(a) the office-bearers of the association, and
(b) 3 ordinary members, each of whom is to be elected at the annual general meeting of the association under rule 15.

(2) The office-bearers of the association are to be

(a) the president ‘.
(b) the vice-president,:
(c) the treasurer. and
(d) the secretary.

(3) Each member of the committee is, subject to these rules, to hold office until the conclusion of the annual general meeting following the date of the member’s election, but is eligible for re-election.

(4) In the event of a casual vacancy occurring in the membership of the committee, the committee may appoint a member of the association to fill the vacancy and the member so appointed is to hold office, subject to these rules, until the conclusion of the annual general meeting next following the date of the appointment.

15. ELECTION OF MEMBERS

(1) Nominations of candidates for election as office-bearers of the association or as ordinary members of the committee:

(a) must be made in writing, signed by 2 members of the association and accompanied by the written consent of the candidate (which may be endorsed on the form of the nomination); and
(b) must be delivered to the secretary of the association at least 7 days before the date fixed for the holding of the annual general meeting at which the election is to take place.

(2) If insufficient nominations are received to fill all vacancies on the committee, the candidates nominated are taken to be elected and further nominations are to be received at the annual general meeting.

(3) If insufficient further nominations are received, any vacant positions remaining on the committee are taken to be casual vacancies.

(4) If the number of nominations received is equal to the number of vacancies to be filled, ‘ the persons nominated are taken to be elected.

(5) If the number of nominations received exceeds the number of vacancies to be filled, a ballot is to be held.

(6) 7be ballot for the election of office-bearers and ordinary members of the committee is to be conducted at the annual general meeting in such usual and proper manner as the committee may direct.

16. SECRETARY

(1) The secretary of the association must, as soon as practicable after being appointed as secretary, lodge notice with the association of his or her address.

(2) It is the duty of the secretary to keep minutes of :

(a) all appointments of office bearers and members of the committee,
(b) the names of members of the committee present at a committee meeting or a general meeting-, and
(c) all proceedings at committee meetings and general meetings.

(3) Minutes of proceedings at a meeting must be signed by the chairperson of the meeting or by the chairperson of the next succeeding meeting.

17. TREASURER

It is the duty of the treasurer of the association to ensure

(a) that all money due to the association is collected and received and that all payments authorised by the association are made; and
(b) that correct books and accounts are kept showing the financial affairs of the association, including full details of all receipts and expenditure connected with the activities of the association.

18. CASUAL VACANCIES

For the purpose of these rules, a casual vacancy in the office of a member of the committee occurs if the member:

(a) dies.- or
(b) ceases to be a member of the association, or
(c) becomes an insolvent under administration within the meaning of the Corporations Law-, or
(d) resigns office by notice in writing given to the secretary,- or
(e) is removed from office under rule 19, or becomes a mentally incapacitated person, or
(g) is absent without the consent of the committee from all meetings of the committee held during a period of 6 months.

19. REMOVAL OF MEMBER

(1) The association in general meeting may by resolution remove any member of the committee from the office of member before the expiration of the members term of office and may by resolution appoint another person to hold office until the expiration of the term of office of the member so removed.

(2) If a member of the committee to whom a proposed resolution referred to in clause (1) relates makes representations in writing to the secretary or president (not exceeding a reasonable length)

and requests that the representations be notified to the members of the association, the secretary or the president may send a copy of the representations to each member of the association or, if the representations are not so sent, the member is entitled to require that the representations be read out at the meeting at which the resolution is considered.

20. MEETINGS AND QUORUM

(1) the committee must meet at least 3 times in each period of 12 months at such place and time as the committee may determine.

(2) Additional meetings of the committee may be convened by the president or by any member of the committee.

(3) Oral or written notice of a meeting of the committee must be given by the secretary to each member of the committee at least 48 hours (or such other period as may be unanimously agreed on by the members of the committee) before the time appointed for the holding of the meeting.

(4) Notice of a meeting given under clause (3) must specify, the general nature of the business to be transacted at the meeting and

no business other than that business is to be transacted at the meeting, except business which the committee members present at the meeting unanimously agree to treat as urgent business,

(5) Any 3 members of the committee constitute a quorum for the transaction of the business of a meeting of the committee.

(6) No business is to be transacted by the committee unless a quorum i . s present and if, within half an hour of the time appointed for the meeting, a quorum is not present.. the meeting is to stand adjourned to the same place and at the same hour of the same day in -the following week.

(7) If at the adjourned meeting a quorum is not present within half an hour of the time appointed for the meeting, the meeting is to be dissolved.

(8) At a meeting of the committee:

(a) the president or, in the president’s absence, the vice president is to preside. or
(b) if the president and the vice president are absent or unwilling to act, such one of the remaining members of the committee as may be chosen by the members present at the meeting is to preside.

21. DELEGATION BY COMMITTEE TO SUB-COMMITTEE

(1) The committee may, by instrument in writing, delegate to one or more sub-committees (consisting of such member or members of the association as the committee thinks fit) the exercise of such of the functions of the committee as are specified in the instrument. other than :

(a) this power of delegation, and
(b) a function which is a duty imposed on the committee by the Act or by any other law.

(2) A function the exercise of which has been delegated to a subcommittee under this rule may, while the delegation remains unrevoced, be exercised from time to time by the subcommittee in accordance with the terms of the delegation.

(3) A delegation under this section may be made subject to such conditions or limitations as to the exercise of any function, or as to time or circumstances, as may be specified in the instrument o( delegation.

(4) Despite any delegation under this rule, the committee may continue to exercise any function delegated.

(5) Any act or thing done or suffered by a sub-committee acting in the exercise of a delegation under this rule has the same force and effect as it would have if it had been done or suffered by the committee.

(6) The committee may, by instrument in writing, revoke wholly or in part any delegation under this rule.

(7) A sub-committee may meet and adjourn as it thinks proper.
22. VOTING AND DECISIONS

(1) Questions arising at a meeting of the committee or of any subcommittee appointed by the committee are to be determined by a majority of the votes of members of the committee or sub-committee present at the meeting.

(2) Each member present at a meeting of the committee or of any sub-committee appointed by the committee (including the person presiding at the meeting) is entitled to one vote but, in the event of an equality of votes on any question, the person presiding may exercise a second or casting vote.

(3) Subject to rule 20 (5)~ the committee may act despite any vacancy on the committee.

(4) Any act or thing done or suffered, or purporting to have been done or suffered, by the committee or by a sub-committee appointed by the committee, is valid and effectual despite any defect that may afterwards be discovered in the appointment or qualification of any member of the committee or sub-committee.

PART IV – GENERAL MEETINGS

23. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS – HOLDING OF

(1) With the exception of the first annual general meeting of the association, the association must, at least once M* each calendar year and within the period of 6 months after the expiration of each financial year of the association, convene an annual general meeting of its members,

(2) The association must hold its first annual general meeting (a) within the period of 18 months after its incorporation under the Act, and (b) within the period of 6 months after the expiration of the first financial year of the association.

(3) Clauses (1) and (2) have effect subject to any extension or permission granted by the Commissioner under section 26 (3) of the Act.

24. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING – CALLING OF AND BUSINESS AT

(1) The annual general meeting of the association is. subject to the Act and to rule 23. to be convened on such date and at such place and time as the committee thinks fit.

(2) In addition to an), other business which may be transacted at an annual general meeting, the business of an annual general meeting Is to include the following

(a) to confirm the minutes of the last preceding annual general meeting and of any special general meeting held since that meeting.
(b) to receive from the committee reports on the activities of the association during the last preceding financial year:
(c) to elect office-bearers of the association and ordinary members of the committee, (d) to receive and consider the statement which is required to be submitted to members under section 26 (6) of the Act.

(3) An annual general meeting must be specified as such in the notice convening it.

25. SPECIAL GENERAL MEETINGS – CALLING OF

(1) The committee may, whenever it thinks fit, convene a special General meeting of the association.

(2) The committee must, on the requisition in writing of at least 5 per cent of the total number of members. convene a special general meeting of the association.

(3) A requisition of members for a special general meeting :

(a) must state the purpose or purposes of the meeting. and
(b) must be signed by the members making the requisition: and
(c) must be lodged with the secretary and
(d) may consist of several documents in a similar form, each signed by one or more of the members making the requisition.

(4) If the committee fails Is to convene a special general meeting to be held within I month after that date on which a requisition of members for the meeting is lodged with the secretary, any one or more of the members who made the requisition may convene a special general meeting to be held not later than ‘) months after that date.

(5) A special general meeting convened by a member or members as refereed to in clause (4) must be convened as nearly as is practicable in the same manner as general meetings are convened by the committee and any member who consequently incurs expense is entitled to be reimbursed by the association for any expense so incurred.

26. NOTICE

(1) Except if the nature of the business proposed to be dealt with at a general meeting requires a special resolution of the association, the secretary must, at least. 14 days before the date fixed for the holding of the general meeting, cause to be sent by pre-paid post to each member at the member’s address appearing in the register of members, a notice specifying the place. date and time of the meeting and the nature of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

(2) If the nature of the business proposed to be dealt with at a general meeting requires a special resolution of the association. the secretary must. at feat 21 days before the date fixed for the holding of the general meeting, cause notice to be sent to each member in the manner provided in clause (1) specifying, in addition to the matter required under clause (1). the intention to propose the resolution as a special resolution.

(3) No business other than that if – specified in the notice convening a general meeting is to be transacted at the meeting except, in the case of an annual general meeting, business which may be transacted under rule 24 (2).

(4) A member desiring to bring any business before a general meeting may give notice in writing of that business to the secretary, NN ho must include that business in the next . notice calling a general meeting given after receipt of the notice from the member.

27. PROCEDURE

(1) No item of business is to be transacted at a general meeting unless a quorum of members entitled under these rules to vote is present during the time the meeting is considering that item.

(2) Five members present in person (being members entitled under these rules to vote at a general meeting) constitute a quorum for the transaction of the business of a general meeting.

(3) If within half an hour after the appointed time for the commencement of a general meeting a quorum is not present, the meeting :

(a) if convened on the requisition of members, is to be dissolved, and
(b) in any other case, is to stand adjourned to the same day in the following week at the same time and (unless another place is specified at the time of the adjournment by the person presiding at the meeting or communicated by written notice to members given before the day to which the meeting is adjourned) at the same place.

(4) If at the adjourned meeting a quorum is not present within half an hour. after the time appointed for the commencement of the meeting, the members present (being at least 3) is to constitute a quorum.

28. PRESIDING MEMBER

(1) The president or, in the president’s absence, the vice president, is to preside as chairperson at each general meeting of the association.

(2) If the president and the vice president are absent or unwilling to act, the members present must elect one of their number to preside as chairperson at the meeting.

29. ADJOURNMENT

(1) The chairperson of a general meeting at which a quorum is present may, with the consent of the majority of members present at the meeting, adjourn the meeting from time to time and place to place, but no business is to be transacted at an adjourned meeting other than the business left unfinished at the meeting at which the adjournment took place.

(2) If a general meeting is adjourned for 14 days or more, the secretary must give written or oral notice of the adjourned meeting to each member of the association stating the place, date and time of the meeting and the nature of the business to be transacted at the meeting.

(3) Except as provided in clauses (1) and (2), notice of an adjournment of a general meeting or of the business to be transacted at an adjourned meeting is not required to be given.

30. MAKING OF DECISIONS

(1) A question arising at a general meeting of the association is to be determined on a show of hands and, unless before or on the declaration of the show of hands a poll is demanded, a declaration by the chairperson that a resolution has, on a show of hands, been carried or carried unanimously or carried by a particular majority or lost, or an entry to that effect in the minute book of the association. is evidence of the fact without proof of the number or proportion of the votes recorded in favour of or ,against that resolution.

(2) At a general meeting of the association, a poll may be demanded by the chairperson or by at least 3 members present in person or by proxy at the meeting.

(3) If a poll is demanded at a general meeting, the poll must be taken (a) immediately in the case of a poll which relates to the election of the chairperson of the meeting or to the question of an adjournment, or (b) in any other case, in such manner and at such.time before the close of the meeting as the chairperson directs, and the resolution of the poll on the matter is taken to be the resolution of the meeting on that matter.

31. SPECIAL RESOLUTION

A resolution of the association is a special resolution :

(a) if it is passed by a majority which comprises at least three-quarters of such members of the association as, being entitled under these rules so to do, vote in person or by proxy at a general meeting of which at least 21 days’ written notice specifying the intention to propose the resolution as a special resolution was given in accordance with these rules; or
(b) where it is made to appear to the Commissioner that it is not practicable for the resolution to be passed in the manner specified in paragraph (a), if the resolution is passed in a manner specified by the Commissioner.

32. VOTING

(1) On any question arising at a general meeting of the association a member has one vote only.

(2) All votes must be given personally,or by proxy, but no member may hold more than 5 proxies.

(3) In the case of an equality of votes on a question at a general meeting, the chairperson of the meeting is entitled to exercise a second or casting vote.

(4) A member or proxy is not entitled to vote at an), general meeting of the association unless all money due and payable by the member or proxy to the association has been paid, other than the amount of the annual subscription payable in respect of the then current year.

33. APPOINTMENT OF PROXIES

(1) Each member is to be entitled to appoint another member as proxy by notice given to the secretary no later than 24 hours before the time of the meeting in respect of which the proxy is appointed.

(2) The notice appointing the proxy is to be in the form set out in Appendix 2 to these rules.
PART V – MISCELLANEOUS

34. INSURANCE

(1) The association must effect and maintain insurance under section 44 of the Act.

(2) In addition to the insurance required under clause (1). the association may effect and maintain other insurance.

35. FUNDS-SOURCE

(1) The funds of the association are to be derived from entrance fees and annual subscriptions of members, donations and, subject – to any resolution passed by the association in general meeting, such other sources as the committee determines.

(2) All money received by the association must be deposited as soon as practicable and without deduction to the credit of the association’s bank account,

(3) The association must, as soon as practicable after receiving any money issue an appropriate receipt.

36. FUNDS – MANAGEMENT

(1) Subject to any resolution passed by the association in general meeting, the funds of the association are to be used in pursuance of the objects of the association in such manner as the committee determines,

(2) All cheques, drafts, b ‘ ills of exchange, promissory notes and other negotiable instruments must be signed by any 2 members of the committee or employees of the association, being members or employees authonised to do so by the committee.

37. ALTERATION OF OBJECTS AND RULES

The statement of objects and these rules may be altered, rescinded or added to only by a special resolution of the association.

38. COMMON SEAL

(1) The common seal of the association must be kept in the custody of the public officer.

(2) The common seal must not be affixed to any instrument except by the authority of the committee and the affixing of the common seal must be attested by the signatures either of 2 members of the committee or of I member of the comminute and of the public officer or secretary.

39. CUSTODY OF BOOKS

Except as otherwise provided by these rules, the public officer must keep in his or her custody or under his or her control all records, books and other documents relating to the association.
40. INSPECTION OF BOOKS

The records, books and other documents of the association must be open to inspection, free of charge, by a member of the association at any reasonable hour.
41. SERVICE OF NOTICES

(1) For the purpose of these rules, a notice may be served by or on behalf of the association on an), member either personally or by sending it by post to the mem6er at the member’s address shown in the register of members.

(2) If a document is sent to a person by properly addressing, prepaying and posting to the person a letter containing the document, the document is. unless the contrary is proved, taken for the purposes of these rules to have been served on the person at the time at which the letter would have been delivered in the ordinary course of post. ,

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Muslim Women’s National Network Australia.

See on-line at: http://www.mwnna.org.au/index.php?categoryid=12

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Muslim Women’s National Network Australia (MWNNA) – About Us

The MWNNA is a peak body representing a network of Muslim women’s organisations and individuals throughout Australia.

We are a multicultural Muslim women’s organization. We welcome Muslim women of all ages, occupations and ethnicities to join with us in sisterhood

Our individual members include lawyers, corporate managers, journalists, teachers, university students and home managers. Our membership is also drawn from a broad mix of ethnic backgrounds from the Middle East, South East Asia, the Pacific Islands, Africa, Europe and America, as well as members who were born in this country.

We are located in Auburn New South Wales. We meet on the first Saturday of every month for discussion, talk or video and a social get together.

Our interests are:

  1. The education of Muslim women and girls to know and appreciate their Islamic rights and duties
  2. Advocacy with government and non-government institutions on behalf of Muslims, especially women and children
  3. Maintaining good relations with Australians of other faiths and joining with them in interfaith meetings and events
  4. Assisting refugees and others in need of help in our society

The MWNNA works closely with leading progressive Muslim figures in Australia and overseas. Many of our initiatives include men and women. In Australia, our members are active in interfaith activities with members of Jewish, Christian (Catholic & Protestant), Hindu, Bahai and Bhuddist faiths.

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Muslim Women’s National Network Australia.

See on-line at: http://www.mwnna.org.au/index.php?categoryid=5

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Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand

The Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand represents Muslim women and is affiliated to the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand. Membership is free to all Muslim women.

There are local branches in Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, and Christchurch. The organisation has been in existence since 1990. The Council also network with overseas Muslim women’s groups.

The Council’s main activities includes: camps for Muslim girls and an annual convention for Muslim women. Submissions have been made to central and local government on issues of concern.

If you wish to join The Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand email group send an email to iwcnz@yahoogroups.com.

Projects 2011
Islamic Women’s Council annual conference

Islamic Women’s Council of New Zealand will be holding it’s Annual Convention in Hamilton from 21-23 January 2011. The conference is for Muslim women, but there will be a public session on Saturday 22 January 2011, including lunch. Further details will be provided soon.

The Conference is open to all Muslim sisters throughout New Zealand and its aims are to:

  • Provide a forum for the Islamic Women’s Council
  • Facilitate the discussion of issues relating to Muslim women in NZ
  • Promote the physical, spiritual and intellectual values of Islam
  • Create an enjoyable opportunity for Muslim women to meet and know one another.

Enquiries may be directed to conference@yourwowma.com.

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Human Rights Commission.

See on-line at: http://www.hrc.co.nz/race-relations/te-ngira-the-nz-diversity-action-programme/participants-2011/islamic-womens-council-of-new-zealand

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Islam in Palmerston North

Size of Muslim Community

It is difficult to know exactly how many Muslims there are in Palmerston North. This is partly because many of the Muslims living here come here temporarily to study at Massey University and therefore there is a fast turnaround time of individuals within the community. The Muslim community in Palmerston North is characterised by many Muslim families coming and going throughout the year.   A rough estimate would probably put the number of Muslims here at around 200-300, although it could be higher.

 

Composition of Muslim Community

 

Islam is a religion for all peoples and the diversity in the Muslim community of Palmerston North is a reflection of this, consisting of people from Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, North America, the Pacific Islands and of course many New Zealanders who have converted to Islam.  In fact, almost every continent is represented! 

 

Mosques and Islamic Centres

 

There are two mosques / Islamic Centres in Palmerston North – one located in the city at 81 Cook Street, and the other on the Massey University Campus, next to the lake, behind the AgHort Lecture Block (see map below or go to the location map on the Massey University website to locate the Islamic Centre on the full campus map). 

 

The building that is now the city Islamic Centre was previously owned by another organisation and was converted into an Islamic Centre, and is now run by the Manawatu Muslim Association. The Massey University Islamic Centre was purpose-built to suit the needs of the Muslim staff and students in 1997 and is maintained by Massey University. 

 

Congregational Friday prayers are run at both Islamic Centres, but normally only during semester time at the Massey Islamic Centre.  Anyone (non-Muslims included) is welcome to go along to watch and listen to the sermon on Fridays or just to visit either Islamic Centre  at any other time. However, anyone interested may want to contact us at IRIS first to get information on appropriate dress, etc. before attending. The congregational Friday prayers are usually held at around 1:30pm during daylight savings time and 12:30pm during the rest of the year and generally last for around 30 minutes.

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Islamic Resource & Information Service.

See on-line at: http://www.iris.org.nz/islam_in_palmy.php 

 

 

 

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Rasheed Memorial Da’wah Trust (RMDT) – Home

Our purpose is to educate and engage people in Islam and in our communities, with a vision of achieving more peaceful, progressive communities by utilising the heart of Islamic practice. We bring our aims to life by being active in specific, selected areas, notably interfaith dialogue (Salamah), religious education (Uloom), ecology (Mizaan) and charity (Ansaar).

RMDT was originally founded by Abdul Rahim Rasheed QSO (1938-2006) and was rededicated to him after his death. The Trust operates primarily in Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, as well as in some Pacific islands such as Fiji, Tonga and Samoa. RMDT collaborates closely with like-minded groups in New Zealand, Australia and further afield.

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Rasheed Memorial Da’wah Trust.

See on-line at: http://rmdt.org.nz/ 

 
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Rasheed Memorial Da’wah Trust (RMDT) – About Us

In 1969 he was one of a group of Fijian Indian migrants who established the Anjuman Himayat Al-Islami. Rasheed provided legal advice and secular leadership. After discussions with members of the wider Auckland Muslim community, the group attended a special general meeting of the NZMA on 23 May 1976 and formally agreed to dissolve their group and incorporate it into a new NZMA. Rasheed was appointed their legal advisor in July.

In January 1977, Rasheed was appointed NZMA president and legal advisor, with Avdo Musovich as vice-president. The executive committee included BF Dibley, Mohammed Musa, Mazhar Krasniqi, Robert A Abdul Salam Drake and VM Blincoe. Hafiz Sidat and Maulana Patel served as religious advisors.

At the NZMA AGM on 6 March 1977 in the Islamic Centre at 17 Vermont Street, Ponsonby (a converted house), Rasheed was confirmed as president, a post he held for 10 years.

In November 1979, the City Council approved plans for a mosque on the land at Vermont Street. Rasheed, Said Alvi, Patel, Krasniqi and Hajji Mohammed Hussein Sahib mortgaged their homes to raise the funds to complete it.

Meanwhile, Muslims across New Zealand had begun to discuss the need to establish a national body to represent their interests. Consequently, the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand (FIANZ) was set up in April 1977 with Mazhar Krasniqi, Rasheed’s friend and close collaborator from the NZMA, as inaugural president.

In September 1979, Rasheed was appointed president. He held this post until the FIANZ AGM on 6 April the following year, and again for two years from April 1981.

Rasheed was a popular figure in the New Zealand media. He was first interviewed by New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation in December 1980, on the regional programme “Top Half” discussing the construction of the Ponsonby Mosque.

He was interviewed on television in June 1983 for Ramadan and again in August 1985 in a short documentary about Muslims in New Zealand.

In February 1987 Rasheed stepped down from the presidency of the NZMA but was immediately appointed Patron by unanimous consent, a position he held until 1990.

In 1988 Auckland was visited by Dr Hajji Ahmad Totonju, representing the World Assembly of Muslim Youth (WAMY), and Hajji Dato Ridwan Abdullah Wu, representing the Regional Islamic Da’wah Council of Southeast Asia and the Pacific (RISEAP). Rasheed met both men and later discussions with their organisations led to him being appointed WAMY’s regional director for the Pacific. This involved visiting many of the Pacific Islands’ Muslim minorities and reporting back regularly to the charity’s headquarters in Saudi Arabia.

Due to ill health, Rasheed retired in 1992 from work as well as from NZMA and FIANZ affairs. However, he continued to lead and take part in community projects and pursued further education. For example, he was a founder and later the patron of the Auckland-based Council of Christians and Muslims (CCM) and felt strongly about improving Christian-Muslim relations.

In the early 1990s he studied with Dr Douglas Pratt (University of Waikato) and in 1996 became a Bachelor of Theology (University of Auckland). Rasheed told the New Zealand Herald that is was only by respecting each others’ beliefs that dialogue could be promoted. In 2005, Pratt honoured Rasheed by dedicating his prestigious book “The Challenge of Islam: Encounters in Interfaith Dialogue” to his former student.

In April 1999, FIANZ hosted a WAMY-sponsored South Pacific Islamic Youth Da’wah Training Course at Ponsonby Mosque, a week-long event largely organised by Rasheed. It attracted more than 100 Muslim youth delegates from the South Pacific region. The chief guest was the Deputy Mayor of Auckland, the Reverend Dr Bruce Huckner. Other speakers included Dr Hajji Mustapha Omari (from the Australian WAMY office) and Dr Pratt.

In June 2000, Rasheed was appointed a Companion of the Queen’s Service Order (QSO) for his many years of community service.

Abdul Rahim Rasheed passed away on 3 October 2006. At a Commemorative Dinner held at Chancery Chambers in Auckland in December – attended by the Governor-General, government ministers, lawyers, judges, doctors, academics and other friends – it was resolved that the rededicated Rasheed Memorial Da’wah Trust would continue and expand on his work.

Watch the Honourable Phil Goff speak about Mr Rasheed at the Commemorative Dinner or read a report of the dinner that appeared in NZ Lawyer magazine.

 

This piece is taken from the website of the Rasheed Memorial Da’wah Trust.

See on-line at: http://rmdt.org.nz/about-us

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